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Introduction

March/April 2018

Unemployment Rate

Labour Force

Employment Insurance

Labour Force Survey

Job Vacancies

Average Weekly Earnings

Payroll Employment, Earnings & Hours


Unemployment Rate

 

Northeastern BC Unemployment Rates

 

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

2009

4.6

4.6

6.5

6.5

8.4

7.7

7.0

8.3

7.9

7.2

5.5

5.4

2010

4.9

4.4

4.6

5.3

6.9

7.5

7.2

6.7

7.6

7.6

6.4

7.1

2011

9.0

9.1

8.1

5.4

5.1

4.0

4.4

4.2

4.3

4.3

2012

3.7

3.6

4.2

3.9

4.8

4.3

4.8

4.4

3.8

2013

4.1

4.6

5.2

6.1

4.9

4.5

4.4

4.9

4.9

3.6

4.7

2014

6.6

7.4

8.2

8.6

8.0

5.9

4.7

4.1

4.0

2015

4.2

4.7

5.9

6.1

6.4

5.5

5.5

6.2

7.0

7.6

2016

8.5

9.2

9.7

9.4

9.6

9.2

8.8

8.6

9.4

9.7

10.1

10.5

2017

10.5

8.7

6.5

5.5

7.0

7.3

6.6

5.2

5.2

6.0

5.3

4.6

2018

3.8

4.5

5.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In February 2018, the unemployment rate in BC is 4.9% and 6.8% in Alberta.

In March 2018, the unemployment rate in BC is 5.0% and 6.8% in Alberta.

— : suppressed to meet the confidentiality requirements of the Statistics Act


Labour Force

BC Highlights - February

The unemployment rate in British Columbia was 4.7% in February, down 0.1 percentage points from January and below the 5.1% it was 12 months ago. Compared to January, the size of the labour force was down (‑6,200), while there was a smaller decrease in the number of people employed (-3,400). Over the past twelve months, job growth (+40,200) outpaced the growth in the labour force (+30,000).

Compared to January, there were 28,500 fewer full-time jobs in February, and 25,200 more part-time jobs. The loss in full-time jobs was felt by the 15 to 24 (‑17,100) and 25 to 54 (-11,300) age groups, while those aged 55 and over saw no change (-100). Part-time employment went up for the 15 to 24 (+11,200) and 25 to 54 (+20,000) age groups, while those aged 55 and over had fewer part-time jobs (‑6,100).

In February, employment in the private sector was up (+3,500), while there were fewer employees in the public sector (-3,400) and the number of self-employed individuals was also down (-3,400) compared to January.

Provincial Comparisons

At 4.7%, British Columbia’s unemployment rate was the lowest in Canada during the month of February. Ontario had the second lowest unemployment rate (5.5%), followed by Quebec (5.6%) and Saskatchewan (5.6%), while Alberta’s unemployment rate (6.7%) was sixth highest among the provinces.

Gender

In February, employment in British Columbia for men (aged 25 years and over) added 900 jobs, while the labour force decreased by 3,500. As a result, the unemployment rate was 4.2%, down from 4.5% for the previous month.

For women (aged 25 years and over), employment increased by 1,700 jobs in February. The labour force remained relatively stable, increasing by 200, which resulted in the unemployment rate decreasing 0.1 percentage points to 4.1%.

Compared to January 2017, the unemployment rate for men was down by 0.4 percentage points to 4.2%, and for women it was down by 0.2 percentage points to 4.1%. Jobs for men increased by 25,300 (+2.3%) compared to a year ago, and employment for women grew by 10,900 (+1.1%).

Youth Aged 15 to 24 Years

The unemployment rate for youth aged 15 to 24 years was 7.9% in February, up 0.9 percentage points from the previous month. Total employment decreased by 6,000, while 3,000 individuals left the labour force. The addition of 11,200 part-time positions could not offset the loss of 17,100 full-time jobs. Compared to February 2017, the unemployment rate for youth was down 0.8 percentage points from 8.7%.

Industry

Employment in the goods-producing sector was down (‑5,300 or ‑1.0%) in February. Construction (‑4,400 or ‑1.8%), manufacturing (‑1,700 or ‑1.0%), and utilities (‑1,100 or ‑7.8%) all lost positions. On the other hand, forestry, fishing, mining, quarrying, oil and gas saw employment increase by 2,400 (+5.0%) positions. In the twelve months to February, the goods-producing sector added 23,200 (+4.8%) jobs.

In February there were 1,900 (+0.1%) more jobs in the services-producing sector over the previous month. Other services (+7,200 or +6.3%) posted the largest increase, followed by health care and social assistance (+3,300 or +1.0%), business, building and other support services (+3,100 or 3.2%), and professional, scientific, and technical services (+2,400 or +1.2%). Conversely, wholesale and retail trade (‑9,500 or ‑2.4%) saw a decrease in positions, while employment for transportation and warehousing (‑1,700 or ‑1.3%) and educational services (‑1,400 or ‑0.9%) contracted as well. Since February 2017, the services-producing sector has added 17,000 (+0.9%) positions.

Visit the Labour Market Statistics page for detailed data tables and other resources.

 

BC Stats Infoline

BC Highlights - March

The unemployment rate in British Columbia was 4.7% in March, unchanged from February and below the 5.3% it was 12 months ago. The size of both the labour force (-2,100) and the number of employed (-3,900) were down slightly from February. Compared to 12 months ago, job growth (+32,700) has outpaced the growth in the labour force (+17,500).

There were 23,800 more full-time jobs in March and 27,700 fewer part-time jobs compared to February. Most of the gains in full-time jobs were observed by the 25 to 54 (+12,000) and 15 to 24 (+9,700) age groups, while those aged 55 and over saw a smaller increase (+2,100). Part-time employment went down for the 15 to 24 (-17,300) and 25 to 54 (-14,700) age groups, while those aged 55 and over had more part-time jobs (+4,300).

In March, employment in the public sector was up (+7,000), while there were fewer employees in the private sector (-6,200) and the number of self-employed individuals was also down (-4,800) compared to February.

Provincial Comparisons

At 4.7%, British Columbia’s unemployment rate was the lowest in Canada during the month of March. Ontario had the second lowest unemployment rate (5.5%), followed by Quebec (5.6%), while Alberta’s unemployment rate (6.3%) was fifth highest among the provinces.

Gender

In March, employment in British Columbia for men (aged 25 years and over) added 1,900 jobs, while the labour force grew by 4,200. As a result, the unemployment rate was 4.3%, up from 4.2% for the previous month.

For women (aged 25 years and over), employment increased by 1,900 jobs in March. The labour force increased by 4,600, which resulted in the unemployment rate rising 0.2 percentage points to 4.3%.

Compared to March 2017, the unemployment rate for men was down by 0.6 percentage points to 4.3%, and for women it was unchanged at 4.3%. Jobs for men increased by 24,900 (+2.3%) compared to a year ago, and employment for women grew by 15,400 (+1.5%).

Youth Aged 15 to 24 Years

The unemployment rate for youth aged 15 to 24 years was 7.3% in March, down 0.6 percentage points from the previous month. Total employment decreased by 7,600, while 10,800 individuals left the labour force. The addition of 9,700 full-time positions could not offset the loss of 17,300 part-time jobs.

Compared to March 2017, the unemployment rate for youth was down 2.3 percentage points from 9.6%.

Industry

Employment in the goods-producing sector was down (‑4,000 or ‑0.8%) in March. Agriculture (‑4,500 or ‑16.6%) saw the largest decrease in employment, followed by manufacturing (‑1,200 or ‑0.7%) and forestry, fishing, mining, quarrying, oil and gas (‑100 or ‑0.2%). On the other hand, construction (+1,100 or +0.5%) and utilities (+700 or +5.4%) added positions. In the twelve months to March, the goods-producing sector added 20,300 (+4.2%) jobs.

In March, overall employment was stable in the services-producing sector (+100 or +0.0%) compared to the previous month. Within industries, educational services (+6,400 or +4.0%) posted the largest increase, followed by health care and social assistance (+5,000 or +1.6%) and business, building and other support services (+3,200 or 3.2%). Conversely, wholesale and retail trade (‑9,200 or ‑2.4%) saw a decrease in positions, while employment for information, culture and recreation (‑7,700 or ‑5.9%) and other services (‑2,300 or ‑1.9%) contracted as well. Since March 2017, the services-producing sector has added 12,400 (+0.6%) positions.

Visit the Labour Market Statistics page for detailed data tables and other resources.

BC Stats Infoline

Employment Insurance

January 2018

The number of people receiving employment insurance (EI) benefits in British Columbia decreased by 620 (‑1.3%) in January compared to December, to reach 45,630 individuals. The decrease was primarily due to a decline in the number of male recipients (-500 persons or -1.8%) although the number of female recipients also declined (‑120 persons or ‑0.7%).

The decrease in beneficiaries in British Columbia was widespread across census metropolitan areas (-230 persons or -1.0%), census agglomerations (-190 persons or -1.4%) and outside census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations (-190 persons or -1.7%). Among census metropolitan areas, Abbotsford-Mission observed the largest decline (-130 persons or -6.0%).

The number of EI claims (an indicator of the number of future EI recipients) went up by 4.5% in January compared to December. Claims increased in five of the provinces, led by Saskatchewan (+6.1%) and Ontario (+5.4%).

Nationally, the number of EI beneficiaries decreased in January, with 5,790 fewer people collecting EI, a 1.2% contraction compared to December. Although the number of women receiving EI declined in the month (‑100 persons or -0.1%), the decrease was almost entirely driven by fewer male recipients (‑5,680 persons or ‑1.8%). The number of EI claims went up by 1.7% in January to reach 236,690.

Data Source: Statistics Canada
BC Stats Infoline

February 2018

The number of people receiving employment insurance (EI) benefits in British Columbia decreased by 250 (‑0.5%) in February compared to January, to reach 45,370 individuals. The decrease was primarily due to a decline in the number of male recipients (-240 persons or -0.9%) although the number of female recipients also declined (‑20 persons or ‑0.1%).

The decrease in beneficiaries in British Columbia was widespread across census agglomerations (-260 persons or -2.0%) and outside census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations (-80 persons or -0.7%). Among census metropolitan areas, Vancouver is the only one that saw an increase in beneficiaries (+180 persons or +1.2%), while Victoria observed the largest decline (-40 persons or -1.9%).

The number of EI claims (an indicator of the number of future EI recipients) went down by 0.7% in February compared to January. Claims decreased in seven of the provinces, led by Ontario (-9.1%) and Quebec (-7.0%).

Nationally, the number of EI beneficiaries decreased in February, with 11,250 fewer people collecting EI, a 2.3% contraction compared to January. Although the number of women receiving EI declined in the month (‑1,750 persons or -1.0%), the decrease was almost entirely driven by fewer male recipients (‑9,500 persons or ‑3.1%). The number of EI claims went down by 5.3% in February to reach 224,340.

Data Source: Statistics Canada
BC Stats Infoline

January 2018

The number of regular Employment Insurance (EI) beneficiaries fell by 5,800 or 1.2% in January to 494,200, continuing a downward trend that began in October 2016.

There were fewer beneficiaries in six provinces, most notably Quebec (-3.4%), Prince Edward Island (-3.1%) and Newfoundland and Labrador (-2.1%). Smaller declines were observed in New Brunswick (-1.8%), British Columbia (-1.3%) and Saskatchewan (-0.9%).

In the 12 months to January, the number of EI recipients in Canada fell by 12.6%.

In general, variations in the number of beneficiaries can reflect changes in the circumstances in a number of different groups, including those becoming beneficiaries, those going back to work, those exhausting their regular benefits, and those no longer receiving benefits for other reasons.

Provincial and sub-provincial overview

In Quebec, 114,800 people received EI benefits in January, down 3.4% from the previous month. The number of EI recipients in the province has been on a downward trend since the summer of 2016. Declines in January were observed in all census metropolitan areas (CMAs), led by Sherbrooke (-12.0%). There were also fewer beneficiaries in areas outside of the CMAs and census agglomerations (CAs) (-3.1%), as well as in the CAs (-3.0%). Compared with January 2017, the number of beneficiaries in the province fell by 16.7%. Over the same period, data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) show that the unemployment rate declined by 0.9 percentage points to 5.4%, a near-record low for the province since comparable data became available in January 1976.

In Prince Edward Island, the number of people receiving benefits fell for the second consecutive month, down 3.1% in January to 8,200. On a year-over-year basis, however, the number of beneficiaries rose by 3.1%.

In January, the number of EI recipients in Newfoundland and Labrador fell by 2.1% from the previous month to 38,400. Decreases were observed throughout the province, with the CMA of St. John's (-8.2%) accounting for a large portion of the decline. On a year-over-year basis, the number of beneficiaries in Newfoundland and Labrador was up 3.0%.

In New Brunswick, there were 31,400 EI beneficiaries in January, down 1.8% from December, and led by declines in the CMA of Saint John (-5.2%) and the CAs (-3.7%). In the 12 months to January, the number of EI recipients in the province fell by 6.0%.

The number of beneficiaries in British Columbia declined by 1.3% to 45,600 in January, the fifth decrease in six months. Declines were observed in the CMAs of Abbotsford–Mission (-6.0%) and Victoria (-3.6%). There were also fewer recipients in areas outside of the CMAs and CAs (-1.7%) and in the CAs (-1.4%). In the 12 months to January, the number of EI recipients in the province decreased by 15.9%. Over the same period, data from the LFS show that the unemployment rate in British Columbia declined 0.7 percentage points to 4.8%, the lowest among all provinces.

In Saskatchewan, 18,000 people received benefits in January, down slightly (-0.9%) from December. Most of the decline was observed in Regina (-5.1%). On a year-over-year basis, the number of beneficiaries in the province was down 4.8%.

EI beneficiaries in Ontario totalled 127,400 in January, little changed from the previous month. However, changes were observed in certain areas of the province. The number of beneficiaries fell in a number of CMAs, most notably Kingston (-9.2%) and Ottawa–Gatineau (Ontario part) (-5.4%). In contrast, Oshawa reported an increase of 20.7%, coinciding with auto vehicle plant closures which are atypical at this time of year. Compared with 12 months earlier, the number of beneficiaries in the province was down 8.7%.

In Alberta, the number of EI recipients held steady at 63,500 in January, with little change across the province. However, in the 12 months to January, there was a decline of 28.9%, the fastest among the provinces. According to the LFS, employment in the province grew by 2.0% over the same period and the unemployment rate fell from 8.7% to 7.0%.

Employment Insurance beneficiaries by occupation

The number of beneficiaries fell in 9 of the 10 broad occupational groups in the 12 months to January. The largest year-over-year declines were among those whose last job was in natural and applied sciences (-20.0%), trades, transport and equipment operators (-17.9%), business, finance and administration (-14.7%), management (-11.2%) and natural resources (-10.3%).

In contrast, the number of beneficiaries in education, law and social, community and government services occupations increased by 2.2%.

Employment Insurance beneficiaries in major demographic groups

There were fewer EI recipients among young men aged 15 to 24 (-7.8%) and men aged 25 to 54 (-1.6%) in January, compared with the previous month.

For women, there was a decline among those aged 15 to 24 (-1.6%). At the same time, more women aged 55 and over (+1.4%) received benefits.

On a year-over-year basis, beneficiaries declined in all major demographic groups, led by men aged 15 to 24 (-20.7%) and 25 to 54 (-16.9%). Over the same period, the number of female beneficiaries fell by 11.3% for those aged 25 to 54, and to a lesser extent among 15-to-24 year-olds (-5.5%).

Employment Insurance claims

The number of EI claims totalled 236,700 in January, up 1.7% from December. The number of claims provides an indication of the number of people who could become beneficiaries.

Claims increased in Saskatchewan (+6.1%), Ontario (+5.4%), British Columbia (+4.5%), Manitoba (+3.7%) and Nova Scotia (+2.0%). In contrast, there were decreases in Alberta (-4.6%), Newfoundland and Labrador (-2.3%), New Brunswick (-2.2%) and Prince Edward Island (-1.6%), while there was little change in Quebec.

In the 12 months to January, the number of claims rose by 4.3% nationally.

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/180322/dq180322a-eng.htm?CMP=mstatcan

February 2018

The number of regular Employment Insurance (EI) beneficiaries decreased by 11,300 or 2.3% in February to 480,200, the lowest level since comparable data became available in 1997.

There were fewer beneficiaries in seven provinces, led by Ontario (-3.5%), New Brunswick (-3.4%) and Nova Scotia (-3.2%). Declines were also observed in Prince Edward Island (-2.5%), Quebec (-2.3%), Alberta (-1.9%) and Newfoundland and Labrador (-1.2%). There was little change in the remaining provinces.

On a year-over-year basis, the number of EI recipients in Canada fell by 13.0%.

In general, variations in the number of beneficiaries can reflect changes in the circumstances in a number of different groups, including those becoming beneficiaries, those going back to work, those exhausting their regular benefits, and those no longer receiving benefits for other reasons.

Provincial and sub-provincial overview

In Ontario, 121,900 people received EI regular benefits in February, down 3.5% from January. Declines were widespread across the province, most notably in the census metropolitan area (CMA) of Oshawa (-12.0%). This coincides with a partial recovery in exports of motor vehicles and parts following atypical plant closures in the automotive industry in January. On a year-over-year basis, the number of EI recipients in Ontario was down by 10.4% in February.

The number of beneficiaries in New Brunswick fell for the third consecutive month, down 3.4% to 30,000 in February. Decreases were observed throughout the province, led by declines across the census agglomerations (CAs) (-4.7%). In the 12 months to February, the number of beneficiaries in the province declined by 10.7%, driven by decreases in the previous three months.

In Nova Scotia, the number of EI recipients decreased by 3.2% to 26,700 in February, led by declines in areas outside of the CMA and CAs (-4.6%). Compared with 12 months earlier, the number of beneficiaries in the province was down by 8.6%.

The number of people receiving EI benefits in Prince Edward Island declined by 2.5% to 7,900. On a year-over-year basis, the number of recipients fell by 2.2%.

In Quebec, the number of EI beneficiaries decreased by 2.3% to 111,700 in February, continuing a long-term downward trend. Decreases were observed across the province, including in five of the six CMAs, led by Ottawa–Gatineau (Quebec part) (-5.1%). In the 12 months to February, the number of beneficiaries in the province decreased by 15.9%. Data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) show that the provincial unemployment rate fell from 6.4% to 5.6% over the same period.

In Alberta, the number of EI recipients fell by 1.9% to 62,100, the first decline in four months. Decreases were observed throughout the province, led by the CAs (-3.1%). Despite the number of beneficiaries staying relatively flat in recent months, Alberta recorded the fastest year-over-year decline among the provinces at 26.7%, due to notable decreases in the first half of 2017. Data from the LFS show that, in the 12 months to February, the provincial unemployment rate fell from 8.2% to 6.7%.

The number of beneficiaries in Newfoundland and Labrador declined by 1.2% to 37,700 in February. Compared with 12 months earlier, the number of beneficiaries in the province edged up by 0.9%. Data from the LFS show little change in the level of employment or the unemployment rate in the province over the same period.

There were 17,800 EI beneficiaries in Saskatchewan in February, little changed from the previous month. However, declines were observed in the CAs (-2.3%) and in the CMA of Saskatoon (-1.4%). On a year-over-year basis, the number of beneficiaries in the province was down 2.1%.

The number of beneficiaries in British Columbia was little changed, totalling 45,400 in February. Decreases in the CAs (-2.0%) were partially offset by an increase in the CMA of Vancouver (+1.2%). In the 12 months to February, the number of EI recipients in the province declined by 15.4%.

In Manitoba, the number of EI beneficiaries held steady at 15,800 in February, with little change across the province. Compared with 12 months earlier, the number edged up by 0.8%.

Employment Insurance beneficiaries by occupation

For the sixth consecutive month, the number of beneficiaries fell on a year-over-year basis in 9 of the 10 broad occupational groups. The largest declines in the 12 months to February were among those whose last job was in natural and applied sciences (-20.8%); manufacturing and utilities (-16.3%); trades, transport and equipment operators (-15.7%); and business, finance and administration (-15.4%).

The number of beneficiaries whose last job was in education, law and social, community and government services edged up by 0.9% compared with February 2017.

Employment Insurance beneficiaries in major demographic groups

There were fewer EI recipients among both men (-3.1%) and women (-1.0%) in February compared with January. For men, declines were observed across all major age groups, led by young men aged 15 to 24 (-5.6%). Among women, there were declines for youth (-2.7%) and those aged 25 to 54 (-1.1%), while there was little change for women aged 55 and older.

On a year-over-year basis, the number of beneficiaries declined in all major demographic groups, led notably by men aged 15 to 24 (-21.4%). This coincides with declining unemployment rates for all demographic groups over the same period, as observed in the LFS. Decreases in the number of beneficiaries were faster for men than for women across all age groups.

Employment Insurance claims

The number of claims totalled 224,300 in February, down 5.3% from January. The number of claims provides an indication of the number of people who could become beneficiaries.

Claims decreased notably in Ontario (-9.1%), Quebec (-7.0%) and New Brunswick (-6.7%). Smaller decreases were observed in Manitoba (-3.7%), Prince Edward Island (-2.4%) and Nova Scotia (-1.6%). At the same time, the number of claims increased in Saskatchewan (+3.9%) and Newfoundland and Labrador (+1.1%), while there was little change in Alberta and British Columbia.

In the 12 months to February, claims decreased by 2.9% nationally.

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/180419/dq180419a-eng.htm?CMP=mstatcan

Labour Force Survey

February 2018

Employment was little changed in February (+15,000). The unemployment rate declined by 0.1 percentage points to 5.8%.

On a year-over-year basis, employment grew by 283,000 or 1.5%. All of this increase was attributable to gains in full-time work (+283,000 or +1.9%), while part-time employment was unchanged. Over the same period, hours worked rose by 3.2%.

Highlights

In February, employment increased for both men and women in the core working age group (25 to 54), while there was little change for youth aged 15 to 24 and for people aged 55 and older.

Employment increased in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, while it decreased in Saskatchewan. There was little change in the other provinces.

Employment gains were observed in several industries, led by health care and social assistance. At the same time, employment declined in a number of other industries, including wholesale and retail trade, and manufacturing.

The number of employees increased in the public sector, while it held steady in the private sector. The number of self-employed workers decreased.

More core-aged people working

Among the core-aged population, employment rose by 41,000 (+0.3%) in February. Increases were similar for both men (+22,000 or +0.3%) and women (+19,000 or +0.3%). The unemployment rate for the core-age group was 4.9% for the third consecutive month. On a year-over-year basis, the unemployment rate for core-aged men and women was down 0.6 percentage points. Over the same period, employment for core-aged men increased by 99,000 (+1.6%), while it was virtually unchanged for women in this age group.

Employment was little changed for both men and women aged 55 and older. The unemployment rate among older women fell by 0.3 percentage points to 4.3%, while it was little changed for older men at 5.7%. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment in this age group increased by 111,000 (+6.5%) for women and by 48,000 (+2.3%) for men.

For youth aged 15 to 24, both the level of employment and the unemployment rate were little changed in February. On a year-over-year basis, their unemployment rate declined by 1.3 percentage points to 11.1% as fewer youth searched for work.

Employment little changed in most provinces

Employment increased by 5,100 (+1.5%) in New Brunswick in February, driven by gains in full-time work. The unemployment rate fell 0.9 percentage points to 8.2%. On a year-over-year basis, employment in the province was little changed.

In Nova Scotia, employment rose by 2,800 (+0.6%), entirely due to increases in full-time work. The unemployment rate was little changed at 7.9%. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment in the province increased by 10,000 (+2.3%).

Employment fell by 2,900 (-0.5%) in Saskatchewan, and the unemployment rate was 5.6%. On a year-over-year basis, employment declined by 8,200 (-1.4%).

Overall employment in British Columbia changed little in February, as full-time declines were mostly offset by part-time increases. On a year-over-year basis, employment in the province rose by 40,000 (+1.6%), entirely due to increases in part-time work.

In both Ontario and Quebec, employment was little changed in February. The unemployment rate was 5.5% in Ontario and 5.6% in Quebec. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment was up by 114,000 (+1.6%) in Ontario and by 74,000 (+1.8%) in Quebec. Meanwhile, the unemployment rate fell by 0.7 percentage points in Ontario and by 0.8 percentage points in Quebec.

Industry perspective

Employment in health care and social assistance increased by 25,000 in February. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment was little changed.

In the "other services" industry, employment rose by 17,000 in the month, but was little changed on a year-over-year basis. "Other services" include services such as repair and maintenance.

Continuing an upward trend that began in early 2016, the number of people employed in transportation and warehousing increased by 13,000 in February. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment in this industry grew by 48,000 (+5.1%).

Employment increased by 12,000 in educational services, while it changed little compared with February 2017.

In public administration, employment rose by 9,000 in February, little changed from 12 months earlier.

There were 7,600 more people working in natural resources in February, bringing year-over-year employment growth to 11,000 (+3.4%). Employment in this industry has been trending upwards since the second half of 2016.

Employment in wholesale and retail trade declined by 22,000 in February. Despite this decrease, employment was up 36,000 (+1.3%) on a year-over-year basis.

In manufacturing, employment declined by 17,000 in February, but increased by 71,000 (+4.2%) compared with 12 months earlier.

The number of people working in professional, scientific and technical services was down by 12,000. On a year-over-year basis, there was little change in employment in this industry.

The finance, insurance, real estate, rental and leasing industry saw a decrease in employment of 12,000 in February, but no change from 12 months earlier.

The number of public sector employees rose by 50,000 in February, following a decline in the previous month. The number of private sector employees was little changed. On a year-over-year basis, the number of employees increased in both the private (+99,000 or +0.8%) and public (+92,000 or +2.5%) sectors.

Self-employment declined by 43,000 in February. Compared with 12 months earlier, the number of self-employed workers increased by 92,000 (+3.3%).

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/180309/dq180309a-eng.htm?CMP=mstatcan

March 2018

Employment increased by 32,000 in March, driven by full-time gains. The unemployment rate was unchanged at 5.8%.

In the first quarter of 2018, employment edged down (-40,000 or -0.2%), as a result of a decrease in January. Over the longer term, employment has been on an upward trend since the second half of 2016.

On a year-over-year basis, total employment rose by 296,000 (+1.6%), with the number of full-time workers increasing by 335,000 (+2.3%). Over the same period, total hours worked grew by 2.2%.

Highlights

In March, among the core-aged population (25 to 54 years old), employment increased for women and decreased for men. At the same time, employment was up for youth aged 15 to 24, and was little changed for people 55 years and older.

Employment was up in Quebec and Saskatchewan, while there was little change in the other provinces.

There were more people working in construction, public administration and agriculture.

The number of public sector employees edged up, while the number of private sector employees and self-employed held steady.

Demographic overview

For core-aged women, employment increased by 26,000 in March, while their unemployment rate declined 0.2 percentage points to 4.7%. On a year-over-year basis, employment for women in this age group rose by 31,000 (+0.5%).

Among men in the core age group, employment fell by 22,000. Their unemployment rate was unchanged at 4.9% as fewer of them participated in the labour market. On a year-over-year basis, employment for core-aged men increased by 50,000 (+0.8%).

Employment for youth aged 15 to 24 rose by 18,000 in March. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment for this group increased by 34,000 (+1.4%), while their unemployment rate fell by 1.6 percentage points to 10.9%.

For people 55 and older, employment was little changed and their unemployment rate increased 0.2 percentage points to 5.3%. On a year-over-year basis, employment for this group grew by 180,000 or 4.7%, outpacing their population growth rate of 2.9%.

Provincial summary

In Quebec, employment rose by 16,000 in March, and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 5.6%. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment grew by 85,000 (+2.0%). Over the same period, full-time employment trended up, rising by 150,000 or 4.5%.

In Saskatchewan, employment rose by 4,200 in March, and the unemployment rate was little changed at 5.8%. On a year-over-year basis, employment for the province was virtually unchanged. Employment in Saskatchewan has been relatively flat since the spring of 2016.

Employment in Alberta was little changed in March. On a year-over-year basis, employment rose by 41,000 (+1.8%), and the unemployment rate declined 2.0 percentage points to 6.3%. The unemployment rate in Alberta has been on a strong downward trend since its peak of 9.0% in the fall of 2016.

Employment in British Columbia held steady in March, and has been relatively unchanged since the summer of 2017. On a year-over-year basis, employment grew by 33,000 or 1.3%, lower than the average year-over-year growth rate of 3.7% throughout 2017. British Columbia continued to have the lowest unemployment rate among the provinces at 4.7% in March.

In Ontario, employment was virtually unchanged in March and the unemployment rate remained at 5.5%. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment in the province grew by 130,000 (+1.8%), mostly in full-time work (+118,000 or +2.0%).

Industry perspective

Employment in construction increased by 18,000 in March. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment in this industry grew by 54,000 (+3.8%), mostly driven by gains in the second half of 2017.

There were 12,000 more people working in public administration in March. On a year-over-year basis, employment was virtually unchanged.

In agriculture, employment rose by 8,100 in March. On a year-over-year basis, employment was flat.

On a year-over-year basis, the fastest pace of employment growth was in transportation and warehousing (+6.1% or +56,000).

The number of employees edged up in the public sector in March, while it was little changed in the private sector. On a year-over-year basis, the number of employees increased in both the public (+123,000 or +3.3%) and private (+77,000 or +0.6%) sectors.

Self-employment was little changed in March. Compared with 12 months earlier, the number of self-employed workers increased by 97,000 (+3.5%).

Quarterly update for the territories

In the first quarter of 2018, employment in Nunavut fell by 700 compared with the fourth quarter of 2017, and the unemployment rate was relatively unchanged at 12.6%.

Employment in Yukon was virtually unchanged in the first quarter of 2018, and the unemployment rate was 2.7%.

In the Northwest Territories, employment held steady and the unemployment rate increased 1.7 percentage points to 8.8%.

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/180406/dq180406a-eng.htm?CMP=mstatcan

Job Vacancies

Fourth quarter 2017

There were 470,000 job vacancies among Canadian employers in the fourth quarter, up 89,000 (+23.2%) from the fourth quarter of 2016, the largest year-over-year increase since the start of the series in 2015. Over the same period, the job vacancy rate rose 0.5 percentage points, reaching 2.9%.

The job vacancy rate represents the number of job vacancies expressed as a percentage of labour demand; that is, the sum of all occupied and vacant jobs.

This was the fifth consecutive quarter with year-over-year increases in both the number of job vacancies and the job vacancy rate. Job vacancies rose across most provinces, industrial sectors and occupational groups in the quarter.

Compared with the third quarter of 2017, the number of job vacancies and the job vacancy rate in Canada (both unadjusted for seasonality) were little changed in the fourth quarter. By comparison, the number of job vacancies and the job vacancy rate declined between the third and fourth quarters of both 2015 and 2016.

The average offered hourly wage for job vacancies was $20.10 in the fourth quarter of 2017, up $0.50 or 2.6% compared with the same quarter one year earlier. Overall, nearly 7 out of every 10 job vacancies were for full-time work.

Quebec and Ontario led growth in job vacancies

Compared with the fourth quarter of 2016, job vacancies rose in nine provinces, with the largest increases registered in Quebec and Ontario. Job vacancies were little changed in Newfoundland and Labrador, the Northwest Territories, and Yukon. Year-over-year increases in the job vacancy rate were also widespread across provinces.

In the fourth quarter, employers in Quebec reported 29,000 (+46.1%) more job vacancies than in the same quarter a year earlier. Rises in job vacancies were widespread across industrial sectors, most notably in manufacturing; accommodation and food services; and finance and insurance. The job vacancy rate in this province rose by 0.8 percentage points to 2.6%, the largest increase among the provinces. Over the same period, data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) showed that the unemployment rate in Quebec declined 1.1 percentage points to 5.5%, compared with a national rate of 6.0%.

Employers in Ontario had 28,000 (+17.3%) more job vacancies in the fourth quarter compared with a year earlier. At the same time, the job vacancy rate rose 0.4 percentage points to 3.0%. This was the sixth consecutive quarter with year-over-year increases in the number of job vacancies for this province. Vacancies rose in 15 of the 20 industrial sectors, including in health care and social assistance and in accommodation and food services. Within Ontario, occupations in sales and services saw the largest increase in job vacancies (+11,000), which was partly driven by a rise in food counter attendants, kitchen helpers and related support occupations.

There were 89,000 job vacancies in British Columbia in the fourth quarter, up 15,000 (+21.2%) from the same quarter in 2016. The job vacancy rate increased from 3.4% to 4.0% over the same period, the highest rate in the country. Increases in vacancies were broadly based across sectors, with the largest rises in accommodation and food services, as well as in construction. These increases helped raise the provincial job vacancy rate in these sectors to 6.3% and 5.7%, respectively. Lower Mainland–Southwest had the highest job vacancy rate, at 4.3%, while North Coast and Nechako had the lowest, at 2.3%. The Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours (SEPH) indicated that payroll employment in British Columbia grew by 3.6% over the same period, the fastest growth among the provinces.

Job vacancies in Alberta were up 8,900 (+20.9%) compared with the same quarter a year earlier, driven by increases in construction; transportation and warehousing; as well as mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction. Job vacancies in this province have increased on a year-over-year basis since the first quarter of 2017. The job vacancy rate in Alberta rose to 2.6%, a 0.4 percentage point rise from the fourth quarter of 2016. Increases were observed in all seven provincial ERs. Banff-Jasper-Rocky Mountain House and Athabasca-Grande Prairie-Peace River (3.7%) had the highest job vacancy rate, followed by Wood-Buffalo–Cold Lake (3.2%). According to the LFS, the unemployment rate in Alberta has trended downward since the end of 2016, following an upward trend that began at the end of 2014.

Among the smaller provinces, Prince Edward Island recorded an increase of 300 (+27.1%) job vacancies in the fourth quarter. The job vacancy rate rose 0.3 percentage points to 2.0%. This was the fourth consecutive quarter with year-over-year increases in the number of job vacancies and the job vacancy rate. According to the SEPH, payroll employment in the province grew by 3.3% between the fourth quarter of 2016 and the fourth quarter of 2017.

Rise in job vacancies in 8 of the 10 largest industrial sectors

Job vacancies rose in 8 of the 10 largest industrial sectors (in terms of employment) between the fourth quarter of 2016 and the fourth quarter of 2017, led by accommodation and food services and by manufacturing. Job vacancies in administrative and support services and in retail trade were little changed over the same period.

Job vacancies in accommodation and food services were up 12,000 (+25.0%) on a year-over-year basis, with the increase concentrated in Quebec, British Columbia and Ontario. The job vacancy rate in this sector rose 0.8 percentage points to 4.4% over the same period. The job vacancy rate in accommodation and food services has been among the highest across sectors since the beginning of the series in 2015, likely reflecting relatively high turnover.

The number of job vacancies reported by employers in manufacturing was 11,000 (+39.0%) higher compared with the same quarter a year earlier. At the same time, the job vacancy rate rose to 2.6% from 1.9%. Job vacancies were up in most subsectors, led by food manufacturing, fabricated metal product manufacturing, and transportation equipment manufacturing. According to the SEPH, payroll employment in this sector has steadily increased since the second half of 2016.

The number of job vacancies in health care and social assistance rose by 8,800 (+23.4%) in the fourth quarter, driven by broad-based increases across subsectors and provinces, most notably in Ontario. The job vacancy rate for the sector rose to 2.3% in the fourth quarter, up from 1.9% a year earlier.

There were 8,600 (+43.5%) more job vacancies in transportation and warehousing in the fourth quarter compared with a year earlier. Within the sector, truck transportation and support activities for transportation registered notable increases. Provincially, there were large increases in Ontario, Quebec, and Alberta. Over the same period, the job vacancy rate for this sector rose 1.0 percentage point to 3.6%.

Widespread increases in job vacancies across broad occupational categories

Job vacancies were up in 9 of the 10 broad occupational categories in the fourth quarter. The exception was occupations in art, culture, recreation and sport, where vacancies were little changed. For the third consecutive quarter, the largest year-over-year increases were in sales and service occupations and in trades, transport and equipment operators.

There were 175,000 job vacancies in sales and service occupations in the fourth quarter, up 33,000 (+23.2%) on a year-over-year basis. The proportion of vacancies for full-time work in this category was 49.5%, among the lowest across the 10 occupational categories. Provincially, the largest increases in vacancies in sales and service occupations were in Quebec, where job vacancies were up 64.0%, followed by Ontario and British Columbia. Job vacancies rose in many of the more detailed occupational groups within the category, particularly food counter attendants, kitchen helpers and related support occupations (+11,000). This occupational group has also been among those with the highest number of vacancies since the beginning of the series.

In the fourth quarter, job vacancies in trades, transport and equipment operators rose by 24,000 (+43.1%). The rise in vacancies is consistent with the increases observed in several related sectors in the quarter: manufacturing (+11,000), transportation and warehousing (+8,600) and construction (+6,100). Increases were widespread across the more detailed occupational groups, with motor vehicle and transit drivers; trades helpers and labourers; and machining, metal forming, shaping and erecting trades reporting notable rises. Across provinces, British Columbia and Alberta had the largest increases in vacancies in this occupational category.

Although the number of job vacancies was little changed in art, culture, recreation and sport in the fourth quarter, changes were observed in more detailed occupational groups within this broad category. Job vacancies rose in photographers, graphic arts technicians and technical and co-ordinating occupations in motion pictures, broadcasting and the performing arts (+700); while they fell in creative designers and craftspersons (-600). On a year-over-year basis, the average offered hourly wage in art, culture, recreation and sport rose 17.2%. Increases in both the offered wage and vacancies in photographers, graphic arts technicians and technical and co-ordinating occupations in motion pictures, broadcasting and the performing arts, an occupation group with relatively high offered wages, contributed to a higher offered wage for the broad occupational category.

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/180412/dq180412a-eng.htm?CMP=mstatcan

Average Weekly Earnings

January 2018

Average weekly earnings of payroll employees in British Columbia (seasonally adjusted, current dollars) went up in January, increasing by $3.47 (+0.4%) to reach $961.09.

Compared to January 2017, average weekly earnings in British Columbia increased by 3.3%, ranking second among provinces. Growth was spread across most sectors, with the largest gains recorded in management of companies and enterprises (+22.7), and utilities (+17.0%).

Nationally, average weekly earnings grew by 0.2% compared to the previous month. Management of companies and enterprises (+2.7%), and finance and insurance (+2.3%) saw the largest increases for the month. Compared to January 2017, earnings increased by 3.2% to reach $995.90.

Earnings across the country ranged from a high of $1,406.01 in the Northwest Territories to a low of $838.61 in Prince Edward Island. Alberta had the highest average weekly earnings among provinces in January, at $1,147.23.

Note that average weekly earnings change due to a number of factors including wage growth, changes in occupation or job experience, changes in the average work week, and changes in the number of people employed in different industries.

Source: Statistics Canada

BC Stats Infoline

February 2018

Average weekly earnings of payroll employees in British Columbia (seasonally adjusted, current dollars) went up moderately in February, increasing by $1.17 (+0.1%) to reach $957.85.

Compared to February 2017, average weekly earnings in British Columbia increased by 3.0%, ranking sixth among provinces. Growth was spread across most sectors, with the largest gains recorded in mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction (+11.2%), real estate and rental and leasing (+10.6%), management of companies and enterprises (+9.9), and trade (+9.6%).

Nationally, average weekly earnings grew by 0.4% compared to the previous month. Information and cultural industries (+6.6%), management of companies and enterprises (+5.7%), and utilities (+4.6%) saw the largest increases for the month. Compared to February 2017, earnings increased by 3.4% to reach $996.92.

Earnings across the country ranged from a high of $1,418.56 in the Northwest Territories to a low of $844.68 in Prince Edward Island. Alberta had the highest average weekly earnings among provinces in February, at $1,158.11. All provinces saw increases in average weekly earnings compared to a year ago, with the exception of Newfoundland and Labrador (-0.9%).

Note that average weekly earnings change due to a number of factors including wage growth, changes in occupation or job experience, changes in the average work week, and changes in the number of people employed in different industries.

Source: Statistics Canada

BC Stats Infoline
Average Weekly Earnings 2017

British Columbia average weekly earnings grew by 2.5% in 2017, to reach $942.01. The increase was second largest among provinces. Management of companies and enterprises (+9.7%), and utilities (+5.4%) saw the largest gains in the year.

Earnings across the country increased by 2.0% in 2017, led by Quebec (+2.8%). All provinces and territories saw an increase in earnings for the year, with the exception of the Northwest Territories (‑0.4%). Prince Edward Island saw the smallest gain among provinces growing 0.3% compared to 2016.

Source: Statistics Canada and CANSIM Table 281-0026.

BC Stats Infoline

Payroll Employment, Earnings & Hours

January 2018

Average weekly earnings of non-farm payroll employees were $996 in January, little changed from the previous month. Earnings were up 3.2% compared with January 2017, largely the result of gains in the second half of 2017.

In general, changes in weekly earnings reflect a number of factors, including wage growth, changes in the composition of employment by industry, occupation and level of job experience, and average hours worked per week.

Non-farm payroll employees worked an average of 32.7 hours per week in January, down from 32.8 in December 2017 and unchanged from 12 months earlier.

Average weekly earnings by sector

Compared with January 2017, average weekly earnings increased in 7 of the 10 largest industrial sectors, led by accommodation and food services. At the same time, earnings declined in manufacturing and were little changed in construction and in administrative and support services.

In accommodation and food services, average weekly earnings rose 8.2% to $399. Earnings in this sector have been on an upward trend since March 2017. This coincides with notable provincial minimum wage increases in Alberta (October 2017) and Ontario (January 2018). Full-service restaurants and limited-service eating places accounted for the bulk of the increase. Ontario, British Columbia and Quebec contributed the most to the year-over-year earnings growth in the sector.

Among employees in public administration, average weekly earnings increased 4.5% to $1,303, driven by gains in local, municipal and regional, as well as provincial and territorial public administration. Ontario contributed the most to the rise.

In wholesale trade, earnings grew 3.4% to an average of $1,220 per week. Gains were mostly attributable to machinery, equipment and supplies wholesalers, which has been the largest contributor to year-over-year increases in this sector since March 2017. The earnings gains in the sector were largely the result of increases in Quebec, Alberta and British Columbia.

For retail trade employees, average weekly earnings rose 3.1% to $576, with most of the growth occurring in the second half of 2017. Increases were spread across a number of subsectors, with building material and garden equipment and supplies dealers, as well as clothing and clothing accessories stores contributing the most to the rise. Ontario and British Columbia accounted for the majority of the year-over-year earnings growth in the sector.

In professional, scientific and technical services, earnings were up 2.9% to an average of $1,357 per week. The rise in earnings was driven by computer systems design and related services, which has been the largest contributor to earnings growth in the sector since September 2017. Among the provinces, Saskatchewan and Nova Scotia had the largest increases.

Average weekly earnings in educational services grew 1.9% to $1,054, driven by gains in elementary and secondary schools, as well as community colleges and CEGEPs. Ontario and Quebec contributed the most to the rise.

In health care and social assistance, earnings rose 1.7% to $900. Hospitals had the largest earnings growth. Quebec, Alberta and British Columbia contributed the most to the earnings increase in the sector.

Among the smaller industrial sectors, average weekly earnings in finance and insurance rose 9.1% to $1,402. This sector has been on an upward trend since August 2017 and was one of the largest contributors to the national earnings increase in January 2018.

In contrast, average weekly earnings in manufacturing fell 1.7% to $1,091. Among the provinces, Alberta and New Brunswick had the largest decreases in this sector.

Average weekly earnings by province

In the 12 months to January, average weekly earnings of non-farm payroll employees increased in eight provinces, led by Quebec. At the same time, earnings were little changed in Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador.

In Quebec, average weekly earnings rose 3.9% to $924, with the majority of the gains occurring in the second half of 2017. The growth was spread across a number of sectors, and the largest contributors were health care and social assistance; professional, scientific and technical services; and public administration.

Earnings in British Columbia grew 3.3% to an average of $961 per week. Earnings increased in a number of sectors, and the largest contributors were health care and social assistance; construction; and accommodation and food services. At the same time, a notable decline in administrative and support services moderated the overall earnings increase in the province.

Average weekly earnings in Ontario increased 3.1% to $1,015, with finance and insurance; public administration; and professional, scientific and technical services contributing the most to the rise.

For payroll employees in Alberta, average weekly earnings were up 3.1% to $1,147. The growth was spread across a number of sectors, including mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction, as well as health care and social assistance. The increase was partly offset by a notable decline in administrative and support services. The earnings increase in Alberta's mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction sector was due in part to earnings in the sector being at a relatively low point in January 2017.

Earnings in Manitoba rose 3.0% to an average of $926 per week. The growth was spread across most sectors. Earnings in the province have been on an upward trend since July 2017.

In New Brunswick, average weekly earnings were up 2.8% to $908, with finance and insurance; administrative and support services; and construction contributing the most to the increase.

Average weekly earnings in Prince Edward Island grew 2.0% to $839, with notable gains in educational services as well as in administrative and support services. The overall growth in the province was tempered by a notable decrease in health care and social assistance.

Among payroll employees in Saskatchewan, average weekly earnings were up 1.7% to $1,029. The largest contributors were public administration, as well as mining, quarrying and oil and gas extraction. At the same time, notable declines in health care and social assistance, as well as in transportation and warehousing moderated the overall increase in the province.

Non-farm payroll employment by sector

The number of non-farm payroll employees was little changed in January from the previous month. However, the number of payroll jobs increased markedly in administrative and support services and in manufacturing. At the same time, payroll employment decreased notably in retail trade and in construction.

Compared with January 2017, the number of payroll employees rose by 357,300 (+2.2%), with most of the increase occurring during the second and third quarters of 2017. Increases were observed across the majority of the sectors, led by health care and social assistance (+45,000 or +2.4%) and educational services (+43,600 or +3.5%).

On a year-over-year basis, the number of payroll jobs also increased notably in manufacturing (+33,800 or +2.3%); professional, scientific and technical services (+31,500 or +3.6%); and public administration (+30,900 or +2.9%). At the same time, a notable decrease was observed in information and cultural industries (-6,000 or -1.7%).

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/180328/dq180328a-eng.htm?CMP=mstatcan

 

February 2018

Average weekly earnings of non-farm payroll employees were $997 in February, little changed from the previous month. Earnings were up 3.4% compared with 12 months earlier, largely the result of gains in the second half of 2017.

In general, changes in weekly earnings reflect a number of factors, including wage growth; changes in the composition of employment by industry, occupation and level of job experience; and average hours worked per week.

Non-farm payroll employees worked an average of 32.7 hours per week in February, little changed from the previous month and up from 32.5 hours in February 2017.

Average weekly earnings by sector

Compared with 12 months earlier, average weekly earnings increased in 8 of the 10 largest industrial sectors, led by accommodation and food services. At the same time, earnings were little changed in health care and social assistance, as well as in manufacturing.

In accommodation and food services, average weekly earnings rose 8.6% to $399. Earnings in this sector have been on an upward trend since March 2017. Full-service restaurants and limited-service eating places, as well as traveller accommodation, accounted for the bulk of the increase. Ontario contributed the most to the year-over-year earnings growth in the sector. The accommodation and food services sector in Ontario has been on an upward trend since the beginning of 2017, with the pace of growth increasing since November.

Among employees in retail trade, average weekly earnings increased 7.5% to $596. Earnings in the sector have trended upward since September 2017. Gains were spread across a number of subsectors, including general merchandise stores and health care and personal care stores. Ontario, British Columbia and Quebec accounted for most of the earnings growth in the sector.

In wholesale trade, earnings grew 4.4% to an average of $1,239 per week. Gains were mostly attributable to machinery, equipment and supplies wholesalers, which has been the largest contributor to year-over-year increases in this sector since March 2017. The earnings gains in the wholesale trade sector were largely the result of increases in Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia.

For employees in public administration, average weekly earnings rose 3.6% to $1,290, with most of the increase occurring in the second half of 2017. The growth was driven by gains in provincial, territorial, and federal public administrations. Most provinces recorded increases in the sector, with the fastest growth occurring in Alberta.

In professional, scientific and technical services, earnings were up 3.0% to an average of $1,373 per week. The rise in earnings was almost entirely driven by computer systems design and related services, which has been the largest contributor to year-over-year earnings growth in the sector since September 2017. Among the provinces, the fastest pace of earnings growth for the sector was in Newfoundland and Labrador and Nova Scotia.

Average weekly earnings in educational services grew 2.9% to $1,049, mainly driven by gains in elementary and secondary schools. Ontario contributed the most to the rise.

In administrative and support services, earnings rose 2.4% to $793. Employment services and services to buildings and dwellings contributed the most to the increase. At the same time, a notable employment decline in the relatively high-paying office administrative services industry tempered the overall increase in the sector. The earnings gains in the sector were largely the result of increases in Ontario.

For construction employees, earnings increased 1.7% to an average of $1,233 per week, driven entirely by specialty trade contractors. Ontario contributed the most to the rise, while a notable decline in Newfoundland and Labrador moderated the overall increase in the sector.

Average weekly earnings by province

In the 12 months to February, average weekly earnings of non-farm payroll employees increased in nine provinces, led by Quebec and Alberta. At the same time, earnings were little changed in Newfoundland and Labrador.

In Quebec, average weekly earnings rose 4.4% to $926. Growth was spread across most sectors, including professional, scientific and technical services; health care and social assistance; and retail trade. Both earnings and employment in Quebec have been on an upward trend since summer 2016.

Average weekly earnings in Alberta increased 4.3% to $1,158. Earnings in the province have been on an upward trend since March 2017. Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction contributed the most to the year-over-year growth, rising 10.7%. Employment in the sector has been relatively flat since summer 2017 and is still below the peak observed in August 2014, just prior to the oil-price shock.

In New Brunswick, average weekly earnings rose 3.8% to $905. Earnings increased in many sectors, with health care and social assistance, the sector with the largest number of payroll employees in the province, contributing the most to earnings gains.

In Prince Edward Island, average weekly earnings increased 3.6% to $845, driven by retail trade, educational services, and administrative and support services. Earnings in retail trade in the province were at a relatively low point in February 2017.

Average weekly earnings in Ontario were up 3.3% to $1,016, continuing an upward trend that began in August 2017. Many sectors contributed to the increase, including public administration, finance and insurance, as well as retail trade. At the same time, a notable decline in information and cultural industries tempered the overall growth in the province.

Average weekly earnings in British Columbia rose 3.0% to $958. Retail trade contributed the most to the increase, with most of the gains in the sector occurring in the second half of 2017.

In Manitoba, average weekly earnings increased 2.4% to $929. Earnings grew in a number of sectors, with information and cultural industries, retail trade and manufacturing contributing the most to the increase.

Average weekly earnings in Nova Scotia were up 1.7% to $861, driven by health care and social assistance. The overall earnings growth in the province was moderated by a notable decline in information and cultural industries.

For payroll employees in Saskatchewan, average weekly earnings increased 1.6% to $1,014. Public administration contributed the most to the rise, partly due to earnings in the sector being at a relatively low point in February 2017.

Non-farm payroll employment by sector

In February, the number of non-farm payroll employees was up 42,200 from January. The number of payroll jobs increased the most in manufacturing and construction. At the same time, payroll employment decreased in the "other services" sector, most notably in religious, grant-making and civic organizations, as well as in personal and laundry services.

Compared with February 2017, the number of payroll employees rose by 359,800 (+2.2%). Increases were observed across the majority of sectors, led by manufacturing (+49,900 or +3.3%) and health care and social assistance (+42,200 or +2.2%).

On a year-over-year basis, the number of payroll jobs also increased markedly in professional, scientific and technical services (+34,900 or +4.0%); educational services (+34,200 or +2.7%); and public administration (+33,300 or +3.1%). At the same time, a notable decline was observed in information and cultural industries (-6,400 or -1.8%).

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/180426/dq180426a-eng.htm?CMP=mstatcan