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A new report on Saskatchewan's mining industry says that companies will need to hire nearly 13,000 workers over the next decade.

The report by the Mining Industry Human Resources Council says 12 per cent of the mining workforce in the province is 55 and older and estimates about 3,600 people will retire in the next 10 years. The council adds that at the current pace, only 6,900 people are expected to join the industry.

Pam Schwann of the Saskatchewan Mining Association says they need to look at strategies for retention. She says one focus has to be on making sure a person who enters at the age of 25 can stay engaged in the sector until they hit 55 and are ready to retire.

The report also says that women and immigrants are underrepresented, while aboriginal people make up about 10 per cent of the industry.

Journal of Commerce

Study: How Quickly do Interviewers Really Make Decisions?

By Peter Harris

New research reveals how employers make decisions about candidates, and what you can learn from the length of length of your job interview.

In an article last month, I mentioned how a short or easy job interview can actually be a red flag that you're not going to get the job. If the employer doesn't take the time to ask you challenging questions and really get to know you, they may not be seriously considering you for the role.

So how long does it take? What can you determine from the length of your job interview? A new study published in the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology attempts to answer those questions.

For this study, researches questioned 166 interviewers before and after they interviewed 691 students at a career fair. Among their queries was how long it took the interviewer to come to a conclusion about hiring the candidates.

More experienced interviewers made their decisions in less time than it took people who were newer to hiring.

Some of the interviewers did make snap decisions about candidates. Roughly 5% of decisions were made within the first minute of the interview, and nearly 30% within five minutes. However, most of the interviewers reported making their hiring decision after five minutes or longer. In fact nearly a quarter, 22.5%, said that they had not made up their mind about a candidate at the end of the interview, and had to decide later.

The largest block, 52% of interviewers make their decision about a candidate in between five and fifteen minutes of the interview.

Want to improve your chances? Build rapport. Candidates who engaged the interviewer in conversation unrelated to the structured interview were given greater consideration than those who did not.

The report states: "Thus, when preparing for interviews, applicants should practice responses to common ‘conversation starters' that often emerge during rapport building."

Also, try to interview early, if you can. Applicants who interview later on are given less consideration than those who interview first. The researchers found that interviewers have to both process information about the applicant in front of them while simultaneously comparing and contrasting them to earlier interviewees.

After the fourth candidate, the amount of information they are trying to sort becomes overwhelming and interviewers revert to making snap decisions based on gut feelings.

What you can tell from the length of your job interview

Since the majority of hiring decisions are made in the first five to fifteen minutes of a job interview, if yours lasts for fewer than 30 minutes, it probably wasn't that successful. If the employer has made the snap decision not to hire you, then they really don't need to spend that much time getting to know you afterwards. However, if in that five-fifteen minute window their decision is in your favour, then it is well worth their time to ask you more probing questions and confirm their choice.

You can read the full report and methodology of the study online here: How quickly do interviewers reach decisions? An examination of interviewers' decision-making time across applicants.

www.Workopolis.com

The 5 Best and 5 Worst Ways to Begin & End an Email

By Elizabeth Bromstein

There was a Bloomberg story circulating on social media recently about the best and worst way to end your emails.

The main takeaway was that everyone hates the sign off "best," while another key point was that "sincerely" is just fake, and the author concluded that you shouldn't use any sign off at all. No, "sincerely," "cheers," or "best regards." Nothing.

The whole thing seemed weird to me, particularly the last suggestion, which is terrible advice for anyone corresponding with people they don't know very well. Sure, it might be fine to forgo the sign off when chatting with your bestie or your dad via email, but I hope you wouldn't make that mistake when talking with a higher up or potential employer.

I decided to survey hiring managers on how they prefer job seekers to begin and end an email.

It turns out that "sincerely" is not only an acceptable sign off when job seeking, it's the most preferred greeting among hiring managers.

Another key finding is that "best" is indeed a bad way to sign off — so they're right about that (note to self: stop using "best). "Cheers" is worse though.

And when it comes to greetings, don't use "hey" or "hi." Go with "hello" or "dear."

I asked 160 hiring managers:

What is your preferred way for a job candidate to begin a written communication?

Responses:

Hello – 40.76%
Dear – 32.48%
Hi – 19.11%
To – 6.37%
Hey – 1.27%

Write in responses included "Good morning/afternoon." (The problem I see with this is you don't know what time of day the person is going to read it.)

What is your preferred way for a job candidate to end a written communication?

Responses:

Sincerely – 46.62%
Regards – 31.76%
Best regards – 18.24%
Best – 2.03%
Cheers – 1.35%

Write in responses included variations upon "Thank you." (I guess I assumed you would say "thank you" before your sign off.)

Interesting. I wouldn't have believed "best" was that bad if I hadn't done the survey myself. I think it was probably fine at one point but everyone uses it now and ubiquity, like familiarity, breeds contempt.

The lesson here? When it comes to the job search, err, as I have always said, on the side of formality. And don't listen to Bloomberg.

Unless they're telling you not to use "best," in which case you should listen.

Thank you so much.

Sincerely,

Elizabeth

www.Workopolis.com

21 Things Every Job Seeker Needs to Know How to Do

By Elizabeth Bromstein

If you're going to get that great job you want, there are a number of things you need to know how to do.

Sometimes people have trouble even beginning that hunt, because they don't know where to start. Or they get stymied by something along the way.

We're not going to let that happen to you.

Here is a list of everything a job seeker needs to know how to do, from start to finish.

1. Stop procrastinating. If you're going to get a job you have to stop binge watching Game of Thrones, stop playing Call of Duty, and get to work. Where to start? Here.

Don't read this later, read it NOW: How to stop procrastinating

2. Make your bed. Believe it or not, making your bed in the morning can dramatically alter the course of your day. Make your bed.

Read this: The secret to success: making your bed

3. Write a resume. Don't use clichés, do use action words, focus on your accomplishments, and never use a generic resume. Tailor yours to every specific position.

Read this:  15 terms you must include in your resume and 10 things that will get it tossed
Read this:  The three things employers want to see in your resume
Read this:  Five resume red flags that make employers reject you right away

4. Write a cover letter. It's a painful part of the process but one you can't skip. The cover letter has three purposes: to introduce you, express your interest in the position, and impress someone enough to land an interview.

Read this: The secret formula to writing the perfect cover letter

5. Use proper grammar and punctuation. Hiring managers get persnickety about that sort of thing. Know how to write properly, how to use an apostrophe and the difference between there, their, and they're.

Read this: Seven resume grammar mistakes that make you look dumb

6. Shake hands. You get one chance not to blow the handshake. It should be easy but so many people get it so wrong. Don't be sweaty, grasp firmly but not too firmly, don't be too quick or hold on too long. And keep moving. Otherwise, you're just holding hands.

Read this: How to shake hands

7. Tell a story. It's not just the story but how you tell it. You need to keep people interested from beginning to end and there has to be a point – a reason you're telling that story. It's a fine craft, but everyone can learn it.

Read this: How to tell a story

8. Research. Never, ever apply for a position or show up to an interview without having researched the company with which you're applying and the role you want to land. Use all the resources that are available to you.

Read this: How to do the one thing interviewers just wish you would frikkin do

9. Start a conversation. Networking is the most important part of your job search. You have to be able to talk to people. Don't think you're above making small talk. Small talk is the foundation upon which big talk is based. Embrace small talk and learn to converse with everyone you meet.

Read this: 10 conversation starters you can use in any situation

10. Answer the most common job interview questions. There are certain questions you're bound to be asked in every interview, including "Tell me about yourself," "What do you know about our company?" and "Why should we hire you?" Be prepared to answer them all the right way.

Read this: The 10 most common interview questions and how to answer them

11. Calm down. You can't show up to an interview freaking out from nerves. Confidence is one of the key factors that will sway a hiring manager towards hiring you. Breathe, eat right, don't overdose on caffeine.

Read this: Nine science-backed tips for calming your nerves on interview day

12. Dress for the job interview. What should you wear? Jeans? A suit? There are very few instances in which jeans would be acceptable, but they do exist. Know the industry and the organization and base your decisions on these things.

Read this: Hiring managers share what to wear for job interviews by industry

13. Write an email. Whether it's an introduction email, a request for help, or just an attempt to reach out to your network, it's vital that you treat professional emails as professional communications. Lose the exclamation marks, emojis, and casual greetings.

Read this: How to write an email
Read this: How to write the email that gets you a job

14. Use social media. During the job search your web presence will almost always make an impression before you get to do so in person. Make sure it's a good one. Keep your profiles – all of them – current and appropriate. Don't send auto DMs, and never forget that what you say and do is public.

Read this: An introduction to using social media as a powerful job search tool

15. Choose a professional looking picture. Your LinkedIn profile picture needs to be professional. Make it a headshot, smile, don't you a photo in which you've cropped out your ex and don't be holding a beer or a cat.

Read this: The most common profile picture mistakes

16. Listen.  Nine out of ten job postings ask for listening skills. You have to learn how to listen. Shut up and stop just waiting for your turn to talk.

Read this: How to listen

17. Remember names.  It's something thing they always say about super successful people: "She always remembered everyone's name." Remembering someone's name sends them the message that they matter, and that will make them feel good about themselves and about you. There are tricks. We should all learn them.

Read this: How to remember names

18. Make eye contact. Too much eye contact is weird. Not enough eye contact is weird. You have to make just enough eye contact. It's a talent.

Read this: How to make eye contact

19. Stand out. One survey found the top reason people don't get hire is because they don't distinguish themselves from everyone else. You have to stand out.

Read this: Survey reveals the No. 1 reason people don't get hired
Read this: How to be unforgettable

20. Write a thank you note. You always send a Thank You note after a job interview, right? Of course you do. Oh, no… wait. What's that? I'm wrong? You don't send a Thank You note? Well, no wonder you can't get a job.

Read this: How to write a thank you note

21. Negotiate salary. Once you land that job offer, how do you get the salary you want and deserve? Name a wide range and explain why you should be in the upper part of that range.

Read this: How to negotiate your salary

www.Workopolis.com

Guys! You've Been Wearing Your Suit All Wrong. Four Ways to Fix It.

By Lisa Mesbur

You know where we stand on the importance of including one great suit in your workwear arsenal, but don't assume that you're all set just because you dropped some dough on a decent mid-weight wool number with a double vent. A suit is one of the best – and best-looking – boosts to your work wardrobe, but common tailoring mistakes will wreck your excellent investment faster than you can say "hem it to here."

To save you from yourself, we got the scoop on common fit errors and how to fix them courtesy of Alan Whitfield, National Director of Tailored Clothing at the venerable Canadian menswear retailer Harry Rosen. You can thank us post-promotion.

Mistake #1: Wrong shoulder shape
The wrong suit shoulder shape can make you look stoop-shouldered (bad) or like an ‘80s boy band member (worse). "Probably the most important thing for people to look for when buying a suit is the shoulder line, because most of the garment's appeal and personality comes through that," Whitfield says.

The fix:
Whitfield suggests analyzing your own shoulder shape before you buy to determine whether you're better suited to a more natural or more structured shoulder.

Keep in mind that whatever style of shoulder pad you choose, the pad should end where your actual shoulder ends.

Mistake #2: Shrunken Suit Syndrome
For the past several seasons, the trend in men's suiting has been increasingly smaller and tighter, but while a little fitted is fine, painted on is not.

The fix:
To look professional but still stylish, aim for a fitted silhouette – but don't cut off your circulation, either. "Good dress trousers should have a bit of a flow," explains Whitfield. "They should be tailored and close to the body, but also be functional and have some longevity. If you have a really tightly fitted garment, it wears a lot quicker than a garment with a bit more comfort."

Mistake #3: Wrong sleeve length
If your suit jacket sleeves are so long your fingers barely peek out or your jacket cuffs stretch three inches up your arm, you'll look like you're wearing either your dad's or your little brother's suit jacket. News flash: neither transmits a confident, professional vibe.

The fix:
Whitfield suggests that suit jacket sleeves be tailored so about a quarter of an inch of shirt cuff is visible.

Mistake #4: Wrong trouser length
Suit trousers look super sloppy if they're too long, but sock-revealingly short can look pretty silly, too.

The fix:
"The rule used to be that the pant should fall to the back of the heel at the back of the shoe; now, in some cases, the back of the pant doesn't even touch the back of the shoe," Whitfield observes. The recommendation? "Something that falls between the ankle and the heel of the shoe – something that has a nice soft gentle break but is still current. A lot of that depends on the style of pant you get – a narrower pant will require a different finished length than a fuller trouser."

www.workopolis.com

The Secret Formula for the Perfect Cover Letter

By Elizabeth Bromstein

Writing a cover letter is a necessary part of the job search, and usually the most painful.

You're trying to sell yourself to someone you've never met and most of us hate doing that.

Even worse, there's a very distinct possibility that nobody is going to read it. But don't dwell on that part because you have to write it anyway and you have to write it as though someone might read it, because someone actually might. So, you might as well just pretend someone is definitely going to read it.

The cover letter is designed to accomplish three things. You want to:

  1. Introduce yourself as a person
  2. Express your interest in the position
  3. Impress someone enough to land an interview

It's often assumed that the cover letter is supposed to bridge any gaps between your resume and the role for which you're applying, but that is not the case. Your resume should be specifically tailored to the job as well.

How do you write the cover letter? Here's a simple secret formula.

1. Start with a greeting:

I'm not a fan of the often recommended method of jumping right in with your personal description like "Dear Mr. Vader. I am a marketing manager with 15 years of experience…"

You might start with something like:

"Dear Mr. Vader: I was excited to find your job posting for a marketing manager for The Galactic Empire on Workopolis because I have been an admirer of your company's marketing and mission for a long time."

2. Say who you are, what you do, why you want to do that particular job at that particular company, and why you are the best person for the role:

"As a marketer with over 15 years' experience, I think I can state with confidence that you will not find another candidate more suited for this position. Not only because of my work history, but because I am passionate in my beliefs in rule by tyranny and that the universe should turn to the Dark Side."

3. Broadly cover your work history, but DO NOT JUST REHASH YOUR RESUME:

"As you will read in my attached resume, I have held a variety of marketing roles across industries from tourism to music festivals. This wide range of experience places me in a unique position, as I have had the opportunity to develop a vast array of skills, from writing and editing, to analytics and SEO, to user experience, audience retention, email marketing, managing budgets, and public relations."

4. Demonstrate how amazing you are by highlighting a triumph:

"In one of my most recent success stories, I was assigned the project of revitalizing tourism to the Ice Planet Hoth, which I did through content marketing and social media initiatives. In one year tourism to the area increased by 500%, providing a much needed revenue boost to local businesses."

5. Use a teaser to spark interest:

"If I get the chance to interview with you, be sure to ask about my success with the annual Tatooine Jazz Festival."

6. Where possible, show you are on top of current trends by addressing challenges in the industry:

"I am aware that The Empire has faced some brand challenges lately thanks to competition from the Rebel Alliance, but I am confident that with my expertise we can turn that around in a very short period of time."

7. Don't forget to talk about what you admire about the company:

"I admire The Empire's staying power in such a competitive industry as well as the company's corporate social responsibility initiatives, including the Storm Troopers annual Sick Children's Hospital drive. It would be a privilege to work for such a respected market leader."

8. Sign off with respectful enthusiasm:

"I would be thrilled for the opportunity to be a part of your rebrand, and would love to meet with you to discuss the value I can bring to your organization. Thank you so much for your time and consideration."

OK? Here's the whole letter.

Good luck writing your own.

Dear Mr. Vader:

I was excited to find your job posting for a marketing manager for The Galactic Empire on Workopolis because I have been an admirer of your company's marketing and mission for a long time.

As a marketer with over 15 years' experience, I think I can state with confidence that you will not find another candidate more suited for this position. Not only because of my work history, but because I am passionate in my beliefs in rule by tyranny and that the universe should turn to the Dark Side.

As you will read in my attached resume, I have held a variety of marketing roles across industries from tourism to music festivals. This wide range of experience places me in a unique position, as I have had the opportunity to develop a vast array of skills, from writing and editing, to analytics and SEO, to user experience, audience retention, email marketing, managing budgets, and public relations.

In one of my most recent success stories, I was assigned the project of revitalizing tourism to the Ice Planet Hoth, which I did through content marketing and social media initiatives. In one year tourism to the area increased by 500%, providing a much needed revenue boost to local businesses.

If I get the chance to interview with you, be sure to ask about my success with the annual Tatooine Jazz Festival.

I am aware that The Empire has faced some brand challenges lately thanks to competition from the Rebel Alliance, but I am confident that with my expertise we can turn that around in a very short period of time.

I admire The Empire's staying power in such a competitive industry as well as the company's corporate social responsibility initiatives, including the Storm Troopers annual Sick Children's Hospital drive. It would be a privilege to work for such a respected market leader.

I would be thrilled for the opportunity to be a part of your rebrand, and would love to meet with you to discuss the value I can bring to your organization.

Thank you so much for your time and consideration.

Sincerely,

Sybegh Tsark

(If you want to see another great example that pretty much follows this formula [and also uses a fictional role at a fictional company] check out this cover letter on Alison Green's Ask A Manager.)

www.workopolis.com